I Want My Hat Back by Jon Klassen

I first started writing this blog to alleviate the minding-tedium that is the first few months of maternity leave. The hours and hours with no one to talk to; the endless repetitive conversations about your newborn; and the monotony of baby groups.

Don’t get me wrong. There are some great baby groups out there and they are useful, essential, a lifeline even – but after years of studying, working and carving out your own identity, it can be tiresome spending hours singing outdated nursery rhymes and talking endlessly about breast vs. bottle.

I did, however, find one baby group that became my rock. In many ways it was just like all the others – singing, repetitive introductions, waving toys in the faces of tiny babies who couldn’t care less – but it had two important things the others didn’t:

  1. A dedicated time for grown up chat
  2. Free coffee and biscuits

The group was run by ‘Judgemental Jane’, a lovely but rather traditional woman. One week she asked us all to bring in a book we enjoyed reading to our child.

Torn between the multitude on our bookshelves, I finally settled on two.

The first was a peekaboo book with sounds which was always guaranteed to elicit shrieks and giggles from my son. When I demonstrated its effect on him there were audible awws from the other parents.

I then shared my second choice – the one I enjoyed the most.

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I Want My Hat Back by Jon Klassen had been sent to us by a friend after I moaned about how boring some children’s books could be.

It follows a sad bear searching for his lost hat. The simple, repetitively structured language is perfect for young children and the illustrations are dramatic and beautiful.

As Jane read the book aloud, I could see everyone was enjoying it and chuckled to myself at what was to come.

After much searching, the bear suddenly realises he has not lost his hat but it has been stolen.

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Then the book takes a dark turn as he exacts his revenge…

(I originally planned to reveal the nature of the revenge here, but I don’t want to ruin the experience of you reading it – and you should!)

The babies and toddlers of course had no idea what had happened, but Judgemental Jane’s face fell as the reality of this book dawned on her. She gazed at me, dumbfounded, muttered something about it being ‘unusual’ and swiftly moved on to another, more innocuous book – probably about a fluffy bunny who like cheese or something equally inane.

I looked around the room at the confused parents and wondered if I was about to be cast out forever.

Then, slowly, a few sly grins crept my way and I knew I’d finally met some like minded parents.

After all, we might be reading for the benefit of our children, but, just like the baby group , sometimes you need to sneak in something for the grown ups too.

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One response

  1. Hi, I started my blog after my son was born and I decided to become a stay-at-home mom. I like I Want My Hat Back. I also found that when I read it in storytime the preschoolers would like it but some of the parents would give me looks like, what was that? Also I feel like the parents hate the story of the Three Little Pigs because the pigs put a pot of water under the chimney to catch the wolf and maybe boil him alive? The children don’t seem to mind though.

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